Christian Modesty Encouraged by Muslim Women?

Over the weekend, as the opportunities arose, my sister-in-law, Karla, asked me about the types of clothing and head coverings I wore, when I wore them, etc. She was genuinely curious about my choices and how they were affecting my life. One question I could not adequately answer:

“Do you think the growing numbers of modestly dressed Muslim women in the U.S. are encouraging or influencing Christian women to seek out traditional modesty standards?”

I couldn’t say no or positively yes. I know I feel encouraged when I see a woman wearing hijab, as one modest woman to another. Since there are perhaps a handful of observant muslimas here in Oklahoma, I do not have the daily reinforcement. Perhaps in major cities where more interfaith interaction might occur, the modesty aura, if you will, might be greater.

What do you all think? Have you experienced encouragement, even just through visual contact with Muslim women, to move towards modesty in your dress and behavior?

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17 Responses to “Christian Modesty Encouraged by Muslim Women?”


  1. 1 Regina May 23, 2007 at 10:24 pm

    I haven’t actually had the opportunity to interact with Muslim women however interesting enough a Muslim family has joined our Christian homeschool for support in their descision to homeschool and I’m sure I will be meeting the mom eventually. It will be interesting to talk with her on this issue.

  2. 2 Regina May 23, 2007 at 10:28 pm

    I think my comment disappeared so I will try this again. I haven’t spoken with any Muslim women about modest dress or even the headcovering but a Muslim family has just joined our homeschool group so I hope to have thge opportunity to meet her in person and talk to her about it.

  3. 3 Carri June 1, 2007 at 4:00 am

    Oh my, yes! We have a large Muslim community in my town/city and they are a real encouragement. Even their young daughters are wearing cover to the schools, the libraries, etc.

    I have a dear friend who is Muslim from Pakistan. She and I are nurses/colleagues. She “covers” when she leaves the building and I cover all the time. (Her cover impedes the work of a nurse most times and she works only with women so her conscience is well with her). She and I are of the same mindset, Muslim & Christian alike, in modesty. And she has even been open to discussing the Bible with me which is remarkable.

    Do I think ‘covering’ is influencing Christian women? Yes, I do. I see it more & more. Do I think covered Christian women can influence their Muslim neighbors? Yes, I do. From one modest woman to another, both find a common bond they share and that opens doors to sharing the love of Christ.

  4. 4 Eva January 25, 2008 at 5:13 am

    This is a very interesting website, I was just looking for some modest clothing and am delighted to see all the women who care so much about modesty that they sew their own garments. I have been trying to gather a whole new more modest wardrobe after becoming Muslim, with no resources here in Alaska, making one own modest clothing is a necessity. I wanted to answer your question from the other side and say that I love to see Christian women dressed modestly, because it is beneficial to the whole society.

  5. 5 Christine January 28, 2008 at 11:56 pm

    I am always encouraged to see anyone covered.I live in canada and there dosent seem to be as big of a movement toward covering as I have seen on the web in the U.S. I feel that it is actually more if anything resisted here. I see a few occassionaly in wall mart but they are quick to be in and out. I myself cover full time and wear something called a pre tied bandana. it is the most comfortable thing I have ever worn. it is not the traditional veil covering but I think that we need to make the covering available to all christians as in ,veriable styles. We don’t all have to look like a mennonite, hutterite, amish to be following 1 corinthians. I think that sometimes it is not just the command that people are not comfortable with but that they think that they will have to look like they are of the “plain people ” to follow the command. I Guess all in all we need to realize it is the same “light just a different lamp”

  6. 6 moe March 14, 2008 at 11:30 pm

    I attend a university with a growing number of covered muslimas and I usually admire their modest dress. The ones that wear tight jeans, and lowriders but insist on not showing a lock of hair are disturbing. That style strikes me as hypocritical and very,very dangerous to me. Those are the girls courting rape.It’s like a virgin taunting men with her body , but then backing out by saying,Oh, but I’m waiting for marriage!

    Burqas spook me out ; I’m not at all comfortable with them.

    Overall though, as a Christian woman it does make me more conscious that the way I dress and behave is a witness to Christ whether I have a bad hair day or got up on the wrong side of the bed or not. I’ve also been encouraged to find out the reasons for Christian veiling and have been veiling at church and have gravitated towards covering my hair in public most days. The older I get the more modest my dress becomes in part out of vanity; no one needs to know that everything’s beginning to sag. But, I also have a deep devotion to the Most Holy Mother of God and wear modest dress in imitation of her.

  7. 7 Shae April 1, 2008 at 2:12 am

    I am a christian woman in australia and i have also been encoraged to dress more modestly and cover me head due to a combination of events. it started as an admiration for the muslim and orthadox jewish women and through my own study of women in the bible. It was all this that cause a confessed ‘tomboy’ to become more modest and feminin in attitude and attire much to my husbands enjoyment. The only time i go out head uncovered is when i am out with him.

  8. 8 Di - April 15, 2008 at 11:46 pm

    I am a Christian woman in the us. I’m 25 and I was born raised in a church that has been in America for around 40 years but originally came from Scandinavia. We dress modestly and until recently all the women wore long modest skirts and modest tops. Now some of the women are wearing pants and more immodest clothing, but not all. I have always felt compelled to follow Paul’s writing concerning the matter, but some Christian women have a problem with it. I alway thought it was cool that muslim women covered, but I was raised that way already so I don’t see that I, personally was influenced my muslim women. Although we do not cover our heads all of the time we do cover in church and when praying, testifying or prophesying.

  9. 9 Christie April 21, 2008 at 7:35 pm

    I was raised to be a modest lady. My parents instilled in me a sense that my physical attributes were not for public consumption. I strayed a little away from that after I married, my in-laws are NY liberals and see nothing wrong with a little skin. But I was never comfortable with cleavage and lots of leg showing and such. Then my little girl was born. Hello!!! I realized I wanted my little lady to dress like a lady and be a lady. Who was she going to emulate… ME!!! Needless to say I have started to shape up and have sewn many dresses for her and skirts for me. And after much research I decided to cover for church and prayer. I just have a few hats and scarves nothing fancy. Well I tend to pray off and on throughout the day so I wear a cover alot, but not 100% of the time.

    Did having Muslim women around draw me into modesty, no not really. But realizing who I was in Christ and who I wanted my daughter to be brought me back to the fold quite quickly. Thank you for writing on modesty.

  10. 10 Jessica August 5, 2008 at 9:01 pm

    Yes! I definitely feel encouraged when I see a sister in modesty 🙂 Last week I ran into a woman at a flea market who happened to be familiar with one of the modest clothing websites I visit. She was dressed in a full-coverage Muslim-style outfit. I had on a cap sleeve top and peasant skirt, so we looked fairly different, but I really felt a connection heart to heart!

    Jessica
    Owner, SakuraRose Boutique
    http://www.sakurarose.com

  11. 11 L February 26, 2009 at 2:36 pm

    A Muslim male friend told me how he appreciated it to see, me a Christian, dressed modest.

  12. 12 Sophie May 16, 2009 at 6:34 pm

    I love your blog! I am a Muslim (convert for 12 years) and I dress modestly. I used to wear ‘regular’ clothing when in public, such as skirts and tops and a scarf but over the past few years I have started to move towards what could be seen as more extreme forms of covering; I now wear the niqab (face veil) usually with a one-piece cloak that covers from the head down; or a two-piece version that looks similar to this, in simple block colours but not necessarily black. I have unfortunately had the occasional remarks such as ‘terrorist’, which is sad, especially since the vast majority of those covering as I do come from mainstream, tolerant groups within Islam that abhor violence but I pay it no mind. It also wasn’t my husband who asked me to cover like this; I became Muslim several years before marriage; and when I could, covered this way back then. I totally agree with the poster ‘Moe’ about the cultural ways of covering that are very provocative; the unfortunate reality is in some cultures they are not practicing Muslims and yet they retain some practices such as the headcovering without any understanding as to the meaning behind it.

    I find myself a lot calmer and inwardly I feel a lot more composed, whereas before I used to feel very muddled and disorganised! As Muslims we are not required to dress like this while in private; but only for (formal) prayer and in the presence of males who are not close blood relatives. Around the house I wear a cotton floral outfit; a slightly different version of what I wear outside if we have guests, or for prayer; otherwise I wear modest but comfortable and attractive attire for my husband. I actually find wearing my ‘outdoor’ garments over lightweight clothing cooler and easier than my previous garb; because as a plus sized woman it was so hard to find regular clothing that I felt covered well and looked ok to boot! I am glad that Christian women are covering also though it isn’t very common yet here in the UK; I feel equally encouraged when I see Christian women striving to please God by covering and dressing and conducting themselves modestly.

  13. 13 Rachel May 26, 2009 at 11:27 pm

    Yes, I feel very encouraged when I see a woman dressed modestly.
    Well, I live in England and people dress very immodestly over here, which makes my heart sink sometimes.
    I am christian, but my husband does not believe yet. He asks me to dress immodestly, but I cannot dress immodestly. Modesty is very important and comes from the heart. I feel protected when I am covered from the evil eyes.
    There are many muslins in England, sadly the youth sometimes it seems they do not have real religion. I saw some muslins girls covered but wearing heavy make up, their clothes were revealing and their attitudes not modest at all. I felt very sad. It was like, even the muslims are becoming like this!
    Off course they were just a group. I hope that does not become a trend.
    However, we that have the Spirit of god within us are the light of the world.
    The modest woman is really beautiful,the glamourous are vulgar, which is ugly. That was not beauty. Real beauty comes from within.
    Lets pray that God may enlightenen the hearts of all the people in the world!

    • 14 Ros January 28, 2011 at 3:10 pm

      Hi I am a Christian woman also living in England and I wish to dress modestly and cover my head is there any websites that show modest clothing for christian women or could the same clothing as muslimahs use I agree with the comment about vulgar clothing that most women wear Ros

  14. 15 Laura November 25, 2009 at 3:05 pm

    Hi! I love the way muslim wimen show their faith EVERY DAY by wearing hijab. I am a born again Christian, baptised to Pentecostal Church. For the majority of Christians in Finland (Our state church is Lutheran) pentecostals are known as very strict. But we really are not. And that actually bothers me. I see so much unproper dressing. I hope we could go back to Bible.

    I myself, am a bit sceared to start to wear a veil. My husband is a bit against it. (He dosn’t like me skipping the uncosher food either, or the idea of having jewish feasts etc…). I don’t know what to do. Should I obey God the way I see is most proper, or my husband, who is a preacher and understands Bible moore than me?

    God Bless you!!!

    • 16 Karen April 7, 2010 at 10:21 pm

      Sweet Heart ,
      I feel your pain on that I to have twoiled with the idea of dressing modestly and changing my behaviors. However husband is against the headcovering around him execpt when I wear church hats which is more for fashion looks to me than honor my head.I suggest you fast and pray for guidance from the Creator.


  1. 1 Modesty from a Christian perspective « Learn About Islam @ Islamic Information Center Trackback on February 2, 2009 at 10:42 am

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